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January Book of the Month: My Own Words by Ruth Bader Ginsburg

My Own WordsMy Own Words
By Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Reviewed by Ruth Geos, Reference Librarian

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, now 84, has been on the US Supreme Court—as of 2017—for 24 years. Deferring her own biography until after her court years are complete, her new book My Own Words (with Mary Hartnett and Wendy W. Williams) sketches out her life in vital strokes, first as a student already aware of inequities in the world, then as an advocate, professor, mother and wife, federal appellate court judge, and since 1993, Supreme Court justice. Far from dry and dusty, this collection of her writings, speeches, and other talks are laced with humor and personal perspective. They create a fascinating sidelong view of the life and mind of a sitting Supreme Court justice and the Court itself—with an added sideline into opera.

In a compelling preface, Justice Ginsburg writes that the Supreme Court’s main trust is to repair fractures in federal law and to step in when other courts have disagreed on what the relevant federal law requires. As the book closes, she makes clear her own intentions, and says that she will continue on the Court as long as she can do the job full steam.

Some of the charms of this collection include glimpses into the personal development of who we think we know as Justice RBG. At Cornell as an undergraduate, she had Vladimir Nabokov as her professor of European literature, and learned about the creative power of words well-chosen. Voted unanimously out of the kitchen by her family in favor of her husband’s culinary skills, her work ethic of long and extended hours continues. She also details how the Supreme Court actually works, day to day and session to session, giving an outline of the “workways” of how the justices share the workload, the collegiality among the members of the Court even in the face of doctrinal differences, and the distinct value of dissents.

My Own Words is highly recommended reading that happens to be both enjoyable and informative. It is a view into one of our most scintillating members of the Supreme Court—a woman of substance and style, with an enduring dedication to equal dignity under the law.

As a bonus, take a look at the interview with Justice Ginsburg earlier this year at the Aspen Institute, where she answers questions about her life, the court, and her special views of how the court makes a difference to all of our lives. http://www.scotusblog.com/media/justice-ruth-bader-ginsburg-discusses-book-words/

The Law Library thanks Shannon K. Mauer of Duane Mauer LLP for generously donating this title. To learn how you can donate, please see our Donation Guide.

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Coming to a Theater Near You: 2 Supreme Court Justice Biopics

SFLL FilmsComing attractions! If you are lucky, you will soon be buying a ticket for or watching on your home streaming service two new, exciting, and very different Supreme Court dramas. The films are about the paths of courage, imagination, and drive for equality pursued by Thurgood Marshall and by Ruth Bader Ginsburg in their early careers as lawyers—preludes to each of their years of service as Justices on the Court itself.

The first—with an anticipated release date of October 13, 2017—is Marshall. Called a thriller by Variety, Marshall tells the story of the bold defense by Thurgood Marshall, then a young lawyer of 32, of Joseph Spell, a black chauffeur accused by his Connecticut employer of rape and attempted murder. These lurid charges became infamous in the tabloids at the time. Co-starring Chadwick Boseman as Thurgood Marshall, and Josh Gad, as Samuel Friedman, a lawyer with no trial experience who offered to join with Marshall for the defense, the cast also includes Keesha Sharpe as Marshall’s wife, and Kate Hudson as the socialite accuser. For a spine-tingling advance peek of a drama of bigotry and truth in a dark time—with books as an ally—try the trailer.

My Own WordsThen, slated for 2018 is the Ruth Bader Ginsburg 1970s-set movie, On the Basis of Sex. This film highlights her championship of equal rights, focusing on her successful appeal of a landmark tax-gender-discrimination case, Moritz v. Commission of Internal Revenue, which stated that dependent care deductions allowed to single women and divorcées could not constitutionally be denied to single men. First announced to be played by Natalie Portman, the role of RBG will now be carried by Felicity Jones, with Armie Hammer cast as her husband and co-counsel, Martin Ginsburg. A narrative on the Moritz case, and their work together, by Martin Ginsburg, (including contentions as to who had the bigger room at home to work in), is also part of Justice RBG’s new book, My Own Words, found in our own San Francisco Law Library collection.

Stay tuned for the sflawlibraryblog film reviews, and if you see these films before we do, please do give us your own comments, reviews, or your own favorite Supreme Court movies from the past.