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Coming soon to California…REAL ID

Real IDCalifornia will offer REAL ID cards beginning January 22, 2018. Do you need a REAL ID card? Here are the answers to common questions about REAL ID.

What is REAL ID?

The REAL ID Act of 2005 requires state-issued driver’s licenses and personal ID cards to meet certain standards in order to be accepted by a federal agency. This includes domestic air travel and entry to military bases and many federal facilities. The DMV will offer federally compliant REAL ID cards beginning January 22, 2018.

How does it affect me?

TSA will begin requiring REAL ID-compliant driver’s licenses or other acceptable form of identification on October 1, 2020. Other TSA-approved forms of ID such as U.S. passports will still be accepted. See TSA’s website for a complete list of accepted forms of ID.

According to the DMV, you will not need a REAL ID to do the following:

  • Drive
  • Apply for or receive federal benefits (Veterans Affairs, Social Security Administration, etc.)
  • Enter a federal facility that does not require ID (i.e. a post office)
  • Visit a hospital or receive life-saving services

(DMV, REAL ID Act.)

You will also not need a REAL ID to vote, register to vote, “participate in law enforcement proceedings,” or access “constitutionally protected activities (including a defendant’s access to court proceedings).” Department of Homeland Security, Real ID Frequently Asked Questions for the Public.

How do I apply for a REAL ID?

Beginning January 22, 2018, the DMV will offer REAL ID driver’s licenses and ID cards. The following steps are required by the DMV:

  • Make an appointment to visit a [DMV] field office on or after January 22, 2018.
  • Provide proof of identity, such as a U.S. birth certificate, U.S. passport, employment authorization document, permanent resident card or foreign passport with an approved form I-94.
  • Show a California residency document.
  • Present proof of your Social Security number.

(DMV, Real ID Act.)

I heard that the State of California was not in compliance with the REAL ID Act. What does that mean?

California is not in compliance with REAL ID. It was granted an extension by the Department of Homeland Security, and therefore California driver’s licenses and IDs may be used for domestic air travel until October 1, 2020.

What if I hold a driver’s license or ID from a state other than California?

Information on state compliance is available on the Department of Homeland Security website, https://www.dhs.gov/real-id.

Where can I find more information on REAL ID?

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FREE MCLE January 17 at Noon: Advanced Research on Westlaw

Wednesday, January 17, 2018, Noon to 1:00pm, Advanced Research on Westlaw
Presented by Amy Dhall, Esq.
Government Account Manager, Thomson Reuters
1 Hour free Participatory MCLE Credit – An Email address is required to receive the MCLE certificate from Thomson.

This program will build on the introductory overview on how to retrieve documents by citation, navigate through the search interface, and use KeyCite. Learn how to search with WestSearch, advanced search functions, Boolean terms and connectors, the West Key Number System, and how to retrieve specific content.

Download this free Westlaw patron access user guide.

Jan 17 2018 Adv Research on Westlaw MCLE Flyer


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Free Competence MCLE January 10

Wednesday, Jan 10, 2018, Noon to 1:00pm, Substance Abuse in the Legal Community
Presented by Amy Dhall, Esq.
Government Account Manager, Thomson Reuters

1 Hour free Participatory MCLE Credit in Competence – This is a repeat of the June 28, 2017 Program. An Email address is required to receive the MCLE certificate from Thomson.

This event will include a discussion of the relevant professional rules of ethics. We will also discuss the effect of substance abuse on the legal practice within our micro-culture of the Bay Area.

Jan 10 2018 Westlaw Competence MCLE Flyer


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January Book Drive

Book Drive

Each month we will seek donors to purchase a new title for the Law Library. Here is our Wish List for the month of January. Growing our collection is about so much more than a single book—it is a living demonstration of how the Library expands the public’s access to justice and provides legal practitioners with the tools they need to represent members of our local community. Please see our Donation Guide for more ways to support the Law Library.

Extreme Speech and Democracy.jpg

Extreme Speech and Democracy
Edited by Ivan Hare and James Weinstein
$53, Paperback, 2011
ISBN: 978-0-19960-179-0

Demonstratives

Demonstratives: Definitive Treatise on Visual Persuasion
Written by Daniel Bender and Robert Jason Fowler
$89.95, Paperback, 2017
ISBN: 978-1-63425-951-4

To donate, please contact sflawlibrary@sfgov.org or call (415) 554-1791.  We appreciate your contribution!


Recent Book Drive Donations

Thank you to Shannon K. Mauer of Duane Morris LLP for donating My Own Words and Woman Lawyer: The Trials of Clara Foltz, part of our September and October Book Drives.

Please take a look at our Book Drive page to see Wish List items from prior months. We are still wishing for these books!

Thank you for your support!


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January Book of the Month: My Own Words by Ruth Bader Ginsburg

My Own WordsMy Own Words
By Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Reviewed by Ruth Geos, Reference Librarian

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, now 84, has been on the US Supreme Court—as of 2017—for 24 years. Deferring her own biography until after her court years are complete, her new book My Own Words (with Mary Hartnett and Wendy W. Williams) sketches out her life in vital strokes, first as a student already aware of inequities in the world, then as an advocate, professor, mother and wife, federal appellate court judge, and since 1993, Supreme Court justice. Far from dry and dusty, this collection of her writings, speeches, and other talks are laced with humor and personal perspective. They create a fascinating sidelong view of the life and mind of a sitting Supreme Court justice and the Court itself—with an added sideline into opera.

In a compelling preface, Justice Ginsburg writes that the Supreme Court’s main trust is to repair fractures in federal law and to step in when other courts have disagreed on what the relevant federal law requires. As the book closes, she makes clear her own intentions, and says that she will continue on the Court as long as she can do the job full steam.

Some of the charms of this collection include glimpses into the personal development of who we think we know as Justice RBG. At Cornell as an undergraduate, she had Vladimir Nabokov as her professor of European literature, and learned about the creative power of words well-chosen. Voted unanimously out of the kitchen by her family in favor of her husband’s culinary skills, her work ethic of long and extended hours continues. She also details how the Supreme Court actually works, day to day and session to session, giving an outline of the “workways” of how the justices share the workload, the collegiality among the members of the Court even in the face of doctrinal differences, and the distinct value of dissents.

My Own Words is highly recommended reading that happens to be both enjoyable and informative. It is a view into one of our most scintillating members of the Supreme Court—a woman of substance and style, with an enduring dedication to equal dignity under the law.

As a bonus, take a look at the interview with Justice Ginsburg earlier this year at the Aspen Institute, where she answers questions about her life, the court, and her special views of how the court makes a difference to all of our lives. http://www.scotusblog.com/media/justice-ruth-bader-ginsburg-discusses-book-words/

The Law Library thanks Shannon K. Mauer of Duane Mauer LLP for generously donating this title. To learn how you can donate, please see our Donation Guide.


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Interesting New 2018 California Laws – Part 2

2018 New Laws

Of course there are more new laws to look forward to in 2018!  Part 2 includes some of the big ones (cannabis, sanctuary state), as well as laws on education and free rides from beer manufactures.

  • Prop. 64/AB 64: Cannabis: licensure and regulation – Californians 21 and over can buy up to one ounce (28.5 grams) of cannabis and 0.28 ounces (8 grams) of concentrates.  See our Cannabis Law LibGuide for more information.
  • SB 65: Vehicles: alcohol and marijuana: penalties – Building on Prop 64 and existing law related to alcohol use in vehicles, this bill adds smoking or ingesting marijuana while in a moving vehicle punishable as an infraction.
  • SB 64: Law enforcement: sharing data – Subject to exceptions, this “sanctuary state” law prohibits state and local law enforcement agencies from using resources to investigate, interrogate, detain, detect, or arrest people for immigration enforcement purposes, as specified.
  • SB 29: Law enforcement: immigration – Now city, county, city and county, or local law enforcement agencies cannot enter into a new contract or renew or modify an existing one with the federal government, a federal agency, or a private corporation for immigration detention centers.
  • AB 830: High school exit examination: repeal – Now the high school exit exam is officially repealed as a condition of receiving a diploma or graduation.
  • AB 19: Community colleges: California College Promise – This bill establishes the California College Promise which waives fees for one academic year to a community college for eligible first-time students enrolled in 12 or more semester units or the equivalent.
  • AB 10: Feminine hygiene products: public school restrooms – Public schools that meet the 40% federal pupil poverty threshold must stock free feminine hygiene products in a percentage of their restrooms.
  • SB 575: Patient access to health records – Health care providers will now provide certain low-income patients with a free copy of medical records when they are needed to support a claim for eligibility for a public benefit program (Medi-Cal, CalWORKs and CalFresh, and veterans benefits).
  • AB 369Appeals: child custody orders or judgments – Building on existing law, this bill authorizes that an appeal can be taken from a final order or judgment in a bifurcated proceeding for child custody or visitation rights.
  • AB 711Beer manufacturers: free or discounted rides – Building on the existing Alcoholic Beverage Control Act, beer manufacturers can now provide consumers free or discounted rides in order to further public safety.
  • AB 564Food and agriculture: fruits, nuts, and vegetables: inspections – The Secretary of Food and Agriculture may now enforce and make inspections of grade, standard of quality, and other provisions of raw unprocessed fruit, nut, or vegetable marketing, food safety, or enforcement program.
  • AB 646Rental property: disclosures: flood hazard areas: areas of potential flooding – Owners offering property up for rent on or after July 1, 2018 must disclose to tenants specified flood-related risk information.
  • AB 527Pest control aircraft pilot’s certificate: unmanned aircraft – Someone operating a manned aircraft in pest control must hold a valid manned pest control aircraft pilot’s certificate.  The same applies to an unmanned aircraft.

Interested in even more new laws?  See these articles for more information:


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Interesting New 2018 California Laws – Part 1

2018 New LawsWith 2017 winding down, it’s a good time to look ahead at the new laws that go into effect in the new year.  Leading up to 2018, we will highlight an assortment of interesting new laws.  Our first roundup is a mix of employment, pets, housing, and dinosaurs:

Employment

  • SB 63: Unlawful employment practice; parental leave – California Businesses with 20 or more employees must now provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid protected leave for new parents (this includes adoptions and foster care). This is an expansion of the California Family Rights Act (CFRA).
  • AB 168: Employers; salary information – Employers cannot rely on an applicant’s salary history information in determining whether to offer employment or what salary to provide.  Also, upon reasonable request, the employer must provide a pay scale for the position.
  • AB 1008: Employment discrimination; conviction history – This amends the existing California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) to state that an employer with 5 or more employees cannot include on any employment application any question regarding an applicant’s conviction history until the applicant has received a conditional offer.
  • AB 450: Employment regulation: immigration worksite enforcement actions – Subject to specified exceptions and in accordance with federal requirements, employers or others acting on the employer’s behalf cannot consent to an immigration enforcement agent entering nonpublic areas of a workplace without a judicial warrant, or granting the agent access to employee records without a subpoena or court order.
  • SB 396: Employment: gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation – Building on FEHA, this bill requires employers with 50 or more employees to add harassment training dealing with gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation.
  • SB 3: Minimum wage: in-home supportive services: paid sick days – Continues the phase-in of minimum wage rates from the 2016 bill.  Minimum wage will be $11/hour for businesses with 26 or more employees, while those with fewer employees continue to pay the current $10.50/hour.  For more information, see this page.
  • AB 908: Disability compensation: disability insurance – This 2016 bill goes into effect next year and revises the formulas for calculating benefits related to unemployment compensation and family temporary disability insurance for periods of disability from January 1, 2018 to January 1, 2022.  It also does away with the 7-day waiting period for these benefits.

Pets, Housing, Vehicles, and Dinosaurs

  • AB 1491: Sales of dogs and cats: contracts – All rent-to-own contracts entered into on or after January 1, 2018 that lease or transfer ownership of a dog or cat are against public policy and therefore void.  So no leasing pets!
  • AB 1137: Housing developments: pet permissibility – Augmenting existing law, under this bill the Department of Housing and Community Development requires certain new housing developments to allow residents to have one or more common household pets, subject to related state laws and local ordinances.
  • SB 838: Transportation – Vehicle registration fees on every vehicle or trailer coach go from $43 to $53 starting April 1st.
  • SB 20: Vehicles: buses: seatbelts – Buses must maintain seatbelts in good working order starting July 1, 2018.
  • Proposition 63: Firearms. Ammunition sales. Initiative statute – Ammunition purchases and transfers must be made in person through a vendor licensed by the Department of Justice.
  • AB 7: Firearms: open carry – Carrying an unloaded firearm other than a handgun in a prohibited public place or street is a crime.  This bill expands the scope of an existing crime and imposes a state-mandated local program.
  • AB 295: Skydiving or sport parachuting operations – This bill adds Tyler’s Law to the already existing State Aeronautics Act, which prohibits parachuting for sport while under the influence.  Now, skydiving or sport parachuting operation owners or operators also have a duty to ensure that the parachutist in charge of a tandem jump and the parachute rigger who packs the parachute are in compliance with all federal parachute safety and certification laws.
  • AB 1540: State dinosaur: Augustynolophus morrisi – We finally have an official dinosaur!  The duck-billed hadrosaur, Augustynolophus morrisi, lived about 66 million years ago and is only found in California.  Our dinosaur now joins other state symbols such as the saber-toothed cat (official fossil) and denim (official fabric).