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Free MCLE on Unconscious Bias Jan. 14

Monday, January 14, 2019, Noon to 1:00pm
Mitigating the Impact of Unconscious Biases
Presented by Matthew Cahill
Founder, Principal Consultant, Percipio Company
1 Hour free Participatory MCLE Credit in Bias

***Download Flyer Here***

Bias resides in the 99+% of how we unconsciously process information in any given moment. Most of the time, it serves us very well. Understanding when it doesn’t is key to improving our decisions, relationships and organizations. This workshop creates an open, immersive environment for exploring decision-making, inclusivity and proactive measures for improving client relations. The output is collective strategies for bias mitigation and empowering attorneys to own the processes.
By the end of the workshop, participants will:

  • Understand Unconscious/Implicit Bias
  • Analyze how UB affects interactions & relationship
  • Define the 5 most common cognitive biases and mitigation strategies
  • Identify mitigation strategies to improve your practice

Jan 14 2019 Bias MCLE Program Flyer

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New LibGuide: Criminal Law

You don’t have to be a criminal defense attorney to be interested in criminal law.  From the early crime pamphlets published by the hundreds starting in the 1500s, to the lurid crime journalism of the Victorian penny press, the public’s appetite for sensational crime stories has been ever-present and insatiable. And thanks to recent and current books, shows, and podcasts, such as I’ll Be Gone in the Dark by Michelle McNamara (about the Golden State Killer) and the multi-season Serial podcast, true crime remains one of the most popular genres across all multimedia platforms.

While knowing all the ins and outs of criminal law isn’t necessary to enjoy the genre, understanding the basic workings of our criminal justice system is essential for an informed member of society. Criminal law covers federal and state laws which make certain behaviors and actions crimes, punishable by either imprisonment or fines. Our newest LibGuide, The San Francisco Law Library Guide to Criminal Law, collects criminal law, criminal procedure, and criminal justice resources available at the library, as well as online and in the Bay Area.

Inside you’ll find links to basic criminal law information, federal, state, and local codes, a list of our criminal law print collection, resources for finding a lawyer or free or low-cost legal services, and much more. This guide is intended for practitioners, students and researchers, and anyone interested in learning how our criminal justice system works (whether stemming from an interest in the true crime genre or not) — from investigation and arrest to conviction and sentencing. As with all of our LibGuides, we will keep this guide updated so be sure to check back in.

So give the gift of knowledge this holiday season by sharing the library’s Criminal Law guide!

 


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December Book of the Month: Corporations Are Not People

Corporations Are Not PeopleCorporations Are Not People: Reclaiming Democracy from Big Money and Global Corporations
By Jeffrey D. Clements
Reviewed by Aaron Parsons, Reference Librarian

In Corporations Are Not People, author and San Francisco Law Library MCLE speaker Jeffrey Clements argues for and enlists readers’ help in passing a Constitutional Amendment to overturn Citizens United. This 2010 Supreme Court decision invalidated or weakened campaign finance laws like McCain-Feingold, and has allowed billions of dollars in corporate funded influence and “attack ads” to drown out average citizens’ voices, ideas, and opinions, in favor of narrow and powerful moneyed interests. This corporate influence, Clements argues, produces an anathema to the democratic protections that were written into our Constitution “of the people, for the people, and by the people.”

Clements discusses similar historical upswings of organized corporatism and traces the current tide as the long-term effect of a push back against environmentalists beginning with the first Earth Day in 1970. The corporate response was an organized attempt to curtail environmental and other regulation, and was led by Lewis Powell—a corporate lawyer and tobacco corporation executive, who would take a new wave of corporate activism onto the U.S. Supreme Court where he wrote corporation-favoring precursor cases to Citizens United, such as First National Bank of Boston v. Bellotti. Under Powell’s influence, corporations “gained vastly increased political power at the expense of average citizens.”

But what is a corporation, and what are corporate rights, asks Clements? He says that, strangely, the definition of a corporation is left vague and described in “word clouds” in Citizens United and other decisions that Justice John Paul Stevens called “glittering generalities.” These generalities allow corporations, as government created entities, to wear sheep’s clothing at the same table that people enjoy, where they are protected by laws, including the Bill of Rights. Clements provides statistics showing the billions spent on lobbying and on saturation advertising in elections by a handful of corporations. He argues that those efforts promote the interests of a few giant corporations at the expense of both conservative and liberal points of view.

Clements offers many resources and avenues to get involved in changing government to work more effectively for the people instead of for a few massive corporations, including his organization, American Promise, that seeks to enact a 28th Amendment to the Constitution and is backed by an increasing number of states, politicians, and Americans from across the political spectrum.

Corporations Are Not People was generously donated to the Library by Mr. Clements.


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December Book Drive

Book Drive

Each month we will seek donors to purchase a new title for the Law Library. Here is our Wish List for the month of December. Growing our collection is about so much more than a single book—it is a living demonstration of how the Library expands the public’s access to justice and provides legal practitioners with the tools they need to represent members of our local community. Please see our Donation Guide for more ways to support the Law Library.

 

SOATL-Prototype-Cover-1

Sexual Orientation, Gender Identities, and the Law: A Research Bibliography 2006-2016
Edited by Dana Neacsu and David Brian Holt
$125, Hardcover, 2018
ISBN: 978-0-8377-4082-9

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What’s It Worth?
Published by Matthew Bender
$396, Softbound, 2018
ISBN:978-1-5221-5796-0

We would welcome a partial contribution toward the purchase of this book!

Blockchain for Business Lawyers

Blockchain for Business Lawyers
Written by James A. Cox and Mark W. Rasmussen
$129.95, Paperback, 2018
ISBN: 978-1-6410-5196-5

To donate, please contact sflawlibrary@sfgov.org or call (415) 554-1791.  We appreciate your contribution!


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Book Review: The Case of Rose Bird

Rose BirdThe Case of Rose Bird: Gender, Politics, and the California Courts
By Kathleen A. Cairns
Reviewed by Richard Schulke, Reference Librarian

The Case of Rose Bird: Gender, Politics, and the California Courts is a timely look at political activism aimed at members of the Judiciary. It recounts the circumstances that led to the removal of Rose Bird as Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court.

This book begins by looking at Rose Bird’s early triumphs during high school and law school, followed by her milestone achievements as the first female law clerk for the Nevada Supreme Court, the first female deputy public defender in Santa Clara County, and the first woman to hold a cabinet position in California.

The book follows Bird’s appointment to the position of Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court in 1977 by a then forty-year-old Governor Jerry Brown—she was both the Court’s first female justice and its first female Chief Justice—and then a series of three attempts to recall her. The attempts ultimately succeeded, and in November of 1986 she was the first Chief Justice of California to be recalled by the voters.

The author examines the then-current politics that made Bird a lightning rod—her liberalism, gender, and the perception that she was soft on crime. The author also takes an in-depth look at Bird’s political opponents and the take-no-prisoner attitude that ultimately resulted in her downfall through political machinations. It is as chilling now as it was then.

The description of Bird’s final years as a broken person battling unsuccessfully against medical issues and early death is a sad ending to her story.

Current events make clear that the issue of “Judicial Politics” is still a hot potato. We recently witnessed both the removal of Judge Aaron Persky following his controversial decision to impose a sentence of only six months for a Stanford student convicted of rape, and the political maneuvering during the confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme Court. This fascinating exploration of Rose Bird and the turbulent beginning of judicial politics in California is still just as relevant today.

The Case of Rose Bird was generously donated to the Library by John Kelly.