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Impeachment Resources at the SF Law Library

With Congress taking the rare step of opening a formal impeachment inquiry, look to the San Francisco Law Library for resources and books to help you understand more about what impeachment is, how it has worked in history, and how the process might unfold today.

Here at the Law Library, you can read scholarly interpretations of the impeachment clause, and it’s history, as reviewed by The Library’s reference team members:

Impeachment

 

 

Impeachment: A Citizen’s Guide
By Cass Sunstein

 

 

 

End Presidency

 

 

To End a Presidency
By Laurence A. Tribe & Joshua Matz 

 

 

 

Limits_of_Presidential_Power_cover-375x561

 

 

The Limits of Presidential Power
By Lisa Manheim & Kathryn Watts

 

 

 

You can also read about reporting and analysis of impeachments since the republic’s founding, including transcripts from the Nixon Impeachment. The San Francisco Law Library has many impeachment resources to explore.

nixon

 

 

 

The Nixon Impeachment Collection

 

 

 

We also recommend these additional resources on impeachment:

A short introduction to impeachment on Findlaw:

https://litigation.findlaw.com/legal-system/presidential-impeachment-the-legal-standard-and-procedure.html

The Library of Congress has a Research Guide and Bibliography of resources on Impeachment. Many are law reviews that are available at the San Francisco Law Library:

https://memory.loc.gov/ammem/amlaw/Impeachment-Guide.html

The University of Washington also has a research guide on impeachment, including images from the Constitution with the impeachment sections highlighted, and links to more information about specific impeachments from history:

http://guides.lib.uw.edu/research/govpubs-quick-links/us-impeach


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September Book of the Month: The President’s House

President's HouseThe President’s House
By William Seale

Reviewed by Tony Pelczynski, Reference Assistant


The President’s House, by independent historian William Seale, is an engaging—if initially imposing—two-volume history of the White House. Running chronologically through America’s Presidential line, from George Washington (who commissioned the construction of the White House, but never actually lived in it) to George H.W. Bush, the book covers the gamut of White House history in entertaining detail. Housed in a sturdy and handsome slipcase, and running to just over 1200 pages, Seale has written an enlightening history of what just might be the most recognizable residence in the world.

Seale, editor of the journal White House History, is eminently qualified to take on the topic: in addition to researching and writing about historic buildings, he restores them. Seale is clearly interested in the White House from (quite literally) the ground up. And while the subject matter and length of the book may seem off-putting to those outside the presumably limited circle of hardcore White House history buffs, Seale’s lively prose and storytelling keep the reader absorbed. While the focus is on the structure itself, the book’s scope necessarily expands beyond (or, more to the point, into) the White House’s walls, taking into account the lives of the men and women who have lived and worked under the White House’s roof: the Presidents and their families, of course, but also the gardeners, cooks, maintenance workers, and others who have historically kept the place running, day-to-day.

As both residence and locus of Presidential power, the White House has always stood alone, symbolically: while the U.S. Capitol and the Supreme Court building may arguably be equally recognizable structures, they both represent collective democratic institutions. The White House is, uniquely, the home of a single (albeit enormously important) individual and his family. Seale’s expansive history continually reminds the reader that the White House is, first and foremost, just that: an actual American home, filled with the messiness and unpredictability of human life that term implies. Over the years, the building has hosted births, deaths, weddings, funerals, and any number of other milestones of human happiness and suffering, to say nothing of the physical upheavals that the structure itself has endured over the years.

At the same time, the White House has always functioned as something of a national museum and political stage. Even those who have never set foot inside the building can conjure a mental image of the Oval Office, or (as is more likely) one of its many cinematic or television iterations. Perhaps because of the White House’s fixity in the American imagination, various presidents and their spouses have, to varying degrees, attempted to stamp the abode with their own personalities and identities, frequently to less than unanimous critical acclaim (recall here Melania Trump’s much-derided minimalist Christmas displays). Seale does a fine job of surveying the various changes the White House and its décor have undergone over the years, none more extensive than President Truman’s “down to the studs” renovations.

Seale ends The President’s House at the George H.W. Bush administration, although he does include a too-brief epilogue touching on the Bill Clinton and George W. Bush years. At 80 years old, Seale may be done writing on the topic, but his book leaves the reader hoping for at least one more update covering the last two Presidential administrations. While its current occupant has reportedly proclaimed the White House to be “a real dump,” given the care and attention to detail that Seale has so clearly poured into his book, one gets the impression that the author feels very, very differently on the subject. Update or no, The President’s House will likely remain the definitive history of this most symbolic of American residences for years to come.


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October Book Drive

Book Drive

Each month we will seek donors to purchase a new title for the Law Library. Here is our Wish List for the month of October. Growing our collection is about so much more than a single book—it is a living demonstration of how the Library expands the public’s access to justice and provides legal practitioners with the tools they need to represent members of our local community. Please see our Donation Guide for more ways to support the Law Library.

Running with the BullsRunning with the Bulls: How to Win Top Dollar Settlements
Written by Nicholas Rowley & Courtney Rowley
$165, Paperback, 2019
ISBN: 9781941007822

30b6 Deposing Corporations30(b)(6): Deposing Corporations, Organizations & the Government
Written by Mark R. Kosieradzki
$155, Paperback, 2016
ISBN: 978-1941007549


Thank you to author Heidi K. Brown for generously donating her two books Untangling Fear in Lawyering: A Four-Step Journey Toward Powerful Advocacy (part of the May Book Drive) and The Introverted Lawyer: A Seven-Step Journey Toward Authentically Empowered Advocacy.

Please take a look at our Book Drive page to see Wish List items from prior months. We are still wishing for these books!


To donate, please contact sflawlibrary@sfgov.org or call (415) 554-1791. We appreciate your contribution!


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September Book of the Month: The Oxford Handbook of U.S. Judicial Behavior

Oxford Handbook of U.S. Judicial BehaviorThe Oxford Handbook of U.S. Judicial Behavior
Edited by Lee Epstein and Stefanie S. Lindquist

Reviewed by Ruth Geos, Reference Librarian


Attorneys use their skills and experience to focus on advocacy of their claims or defenses: briefing the law and the facts of the case to the court in the most advantageous way, arguing the merits and demonstrating how both precedent and public policy goals support their position. The Oxford Handbook of U.S. Judicial Behavior offers another perspective, using social science empirical analysis to look at the dynamics of judicial decision-making beyond the law of the case. In asking other kinds of questions, these studies see the process of judicial decision-making as taking place with a larger institutional, social, and constitutional construct, subject to internal and external influences. Over a wide range of inquiries, the authors assess studies that measure the personal, psychological, financial, institutional, historical, and political influences that impact judicial behavior and ultimately, judicial decision-making.

By poking behind the curtain of the law in this way, a very different look at the courts is presented: how the courts function both as gatekeepers and reciprocal partners in public policy, with hints for the rest of us to glean along the way as to what might strengthen a case, settlement, an oral argument, or a petition for certiorari.

Some of the statistical rigor presented can be dense, but there is much to appreciate in the methodology, especially in the narratives that are caught in the same sociological net. One fascinating example of a study protocol is the use of plagiarism detection software to evaluate how much content of a lower court opinion or content from amicus briefs are included in Supreme Court opinions as a means of tracking influence from these sources. Meta-analysis from another study shows that ideology is a better predictor of votes at the Supreme Court level than at either the District Court or Circuit Court level. Descriptions about the workings of the courts, and particularly the U.S. Supreme Court, offer compelling inside-views, such as the expanded role of Supreme Court law clerks (who have their own law clerk dining room), describing the “cert pool,” established in the 1970s, by which petitions for certiorari are reviewed initially not by the Justices themselves but by a shared pool of law clerks for six of the eight justices (Justices Alito and Gorsuch currently opting out of the pool). Another chapter considers the influences that may have come to bear on Chief Justice Roberts when he shifted his initial position with the conservatives on the court, to join in the vote to uphold the Affordable Care Act. And a made-for-movie story is that of Chief Justice Burger wanting his childhood friend, Harry Blackmun, on the court, which didn’t turn out well for them, but opened a study into the significance of common social backgrounds.

The Oxford Handbook of U.S. Judicial Behavior is perhaps not the kind of book to read cover-to-cover, but it has treasures to ponder, along with an introduction to a new way of thinking about our court system—and the litigation we lay at its door.


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September Book Drive

Book Drive

Each month we will seek donors to purchase a new title for the Law Library. Here is our Wish List for the month of September. Growing our collection is about so much more than a single book—it is a living demonstration of how the Library expands the public’s access to justice and provides legal practitioners with the tools they need to represent members of our local community. Please see our Donation Guide for more ways to support the Law Library.

Cal Med Mal

California Medical Malpractice: Law and Practice, rev. ed.
Volumes 1 & 2
Written by George McDonald
$273 per volume, Hardbound, 2003 with 2018–2019 Pocket Part


Thank you to author Heidi K. Brown for generously donating her two books Untangling Fear in Lawyering: A Four-Step Journey Toward Powerful Advocacy (part of the May Book Drive) and The Introverted Lawyer: A Seven-Step Journey Toward Authentically Empowered Advocacy.

Please take a look at our Book Drive page to see Wish List items from prior months. We are still wishing for these books!


To donate, please contact sflawlibrary@sfgov.org or call (415) 554-1791. We appreciate your contribution!


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August Book of the Month: Untangling Fear in Lawyering

Untangling Fear in LawyeringUntangling Fear in Lawyering: A Four-Step Journey Toward Powerful Advocacy
By Heidi K. Brown

Reviewed by Andrea Woods, Reference Librarian


This refreshing new book from Heidi K. Brown—litigator, author, professor, and Law Library MCLE presenter on August 9th—soundly dispenses with the tired conventional wisdom surrounding how to handle fear, and instead invites lawyers to distill and untangle their fear. When a new attorney feels daunted at the prospect of facing a cantankerous judge or a 1L worries about an intimidating professor’s use of the Socratic method, the typical advice is to simply “push through” fears, or “fake it till you make it.” But in Untangling Fear in Lawyering: A Four-Step Journey Toward Powerful Advocacy, Brown challenges this approach as being at best, phenomenally unhelpful, and at worst, highly destructive to a lawyer’s on-the-job performance and mental health. Fear is not a weakness, and it is not a motivator. Rather than downplay fear, Brown acknowledges that fear in lawyering is very real and very legitimate—lawyers face stressful situations marked by emotional clients, tight deadlines, and enormous consequences for even a small mistake. In fact, the entire legal profession is a culture built around fear, and lawyers adopt these rights-of-passage as a badge of honor. Brown sees how the culture of fear leads to anxiety, depression, and burnout, and can drive excellent lawyers away from the profession. She posits that legal education and practice can be improved by radically changing how we approach fear.

Brown proposes that we try to understand fear, to tease apart the perceived threats from reality. With self-awareness, we can use specific strategies to manage fear, rather than simply attempting to squelch it with pithy sayings that only wind up amplifying it. She explores the science of fight-or-flight as well as the tangled knot of emotions—shame, rejection, unworthiness, or the false bravado that hides a scarcity mindset—so that we can start to unpack fear’s grip and develop confidence. Next, Brown delves into how other professions approach fear, citing that medical and journalism curricula actively teach students what to do when they make a mistake in their future vocation. Similarly, in the realm of professional sports, the mental and emotional training that athletes receive is instructive on how to stop the onslaught of negative, destructive thought patterns. Brown follows with a four-step program that will cultivate true strength and courage in lawyering, in which we untangle fear, mentally reboot, channel our inner athlete, and build a culture of fortitude. She includes exercises to guide us through this process of learning how to stop repressing fear, and instead, to grow in spite of it. Finally, appendices set forth checklists, teaching strategies for educators, and ideas for law firm managers, and a comprehensive bibliography lists suggested further reading on numerous related topics.

Not only is Untangling Fear essential reading for a lawyer’s own personal growth, but it is also an important assessment of the dysfunctional culture for which the entire legal profession is renowned. As the legal industry continues to study the mental health and substance abuse problems that are all too common among lawyers, Brown makes clear that understanding fear and the emotions that surround it is critical to improving the overall health and culture of the profession.


Untangling Fear in Lawyering was generously donated to the Law Library by author Heidi K. Brown during our May Book Drive. Ms. Brown will be presenting The Introverted Lawyer MCLE program on Friday, August 9th from 12–1 as part of the Library’s Lunchtime Speaker Series.


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August Book Drive

Book Drive

Each month we will seek donors to purchase a new title for the Law Library. Here is our Wish List for the month of August. Growing our collection is about so much more than a single book—it is a living demonstration of how the Library expands the public’s access to justice and provides legal practitioners with the tools they need to represent members of our local community. Please see our Donation Guide for more ways to support the Law Library.

Lawyer's Guide to Increasing RevenueThe Lawyer’s Guide to Increasing Revenue, 3rd ed.
Written by Arthur G. Greene and Peter D. Roberts
$54.95, Paperback, 2019
ISBN: 978-1-64105-466-9

Formulas for Calculating DamagesFormulas for Calculating Damages, 2nd ed.
Written by Mark Guralnick
$169.95, Paperback, 2019
ISBN: 978-1-64105-460-7

Waivers BookThe Waivers Book: Advanced Issues in Immigration Practice
2nd ed.

Written by Irene Scharf et al.
$269, Paperback, 2017
ISBN: 978-1573704090
We would welcome a partial contribution toward the purchase of this book!


Thank you to author Heidi K. Brown for generously donating her two books Untangling Fear in Lawyering: A Four-Step Journey Toward Powerful Advocacy (part of the May Book Drive) and The Introverted Lawyer: A Seven-Step Journey Toward Authentically Empowered AdvocacyAnd come to our upcoming free lunchtime program on August 9th featuring the author herself!

Please take a look at our Book Drive page to see Wish List items from prior months. We are still wishing for these books!


To donate, please contact sflawlibrary@sfgov.org or call (415) 554-1791. We appreciate your contribution!