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Proposed Cannabis Regulations Now Posted

4.28 Cannabis

The California Bureau of Medical Cannabis (BMCR) is the lead agency regulating the cannabis industry in California. Today the BMCR has posted its proposed licensing regulations for medical cannabis and the 45-day public comment period is now underway.

There will also be four public hearings on the proposed regulations. You can review the regulations and come to a hearing near you to provide feedback. The hearings are being held in June in Eureka, LA, Sacramento, and San Jose. For full details, see the BCMR’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

If you can’t attend one of the sessions, you can still get involved by following the steps on this website: http://www.bmcr.ca.gov/about_us/documents/17-065_public_comment.pdf.

If you’re interested in reviewing the medical regulations for licensing dispensaries, distribution, and transporters, you can visit the new Cannabis Web Portal. This new site also has cultivation regulations and manufacturing regulations for medical cannabis.

For more cannabis law info, check in with this blog and stay tuned for a Cannabis LibGuide from the Library. In the meantime, don’t forget to check out the rest of our excellent research guides!

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Copyright Title Donated to Collection

New!  The Music Copyright Manual, by Jim Jesse, (generously donated to the Law Library by Shannon K. Mauer of Duane Morris LLP)

Written from the perspective of an attorney who is also a musician and songwriter, The Music Copyright Manual  is a practical introduction to copyright for the non-specialist and a jumping-off point to more expansive materials at the Law Library, such as Nimmer on Copyright. Topics include: why it’s important for music producers to know about the copyright principles covered, including the exclusive rights that come with a copyright, and the challenge of applying copyright principles in the digital age. The concluding chapters cover copyright infringement lawsuits from the plaintiff and defense perspectives, as well as damages and famous copyright cases.


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World IP Day

World Intellectual Property Day is April 26. World IP day follows World Book and Copyright Day, on April 23 —the date commemorating the deaths, mere days apart, of William Shakespeare and Miguel de Cervantes, in 1616.  This year’s theme for World IP Day is Innovation-Improving Lives.

In the spirit of these celebrations, the law library is highlighting our IP Research Guide, one of several of our new and expanding guide collection. Our IP guide lists Patent, Trademark, Copyright, and Trade Secret resources within or outside of the library. Find out more about Intellectual Property Day, and IP generally, at the World Intellectual Property Organization’s website.

 


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Recent Judge Program

Classroom v. Courtroom: Law School Reform & Reform in the Courts
Presented by the Honorable Curtis E. A. Karnow
Judge of the San Francisco Superior Court

April 20, One Hour of Free MCLE

Curtis Karnow, a judge on the Superior Court of San Francisco, on the occasion of his new book, Litigation in Practice, discussed reforms in law school classrooms and law journals – reforms needed to help lawyers, and the courts, better do their work.

Litigation in Practice by Curtis E. A. Karnow
Author of Rutter’s Civil Procedure Before Trial (West/Thomson Reuters), Superior Court Judge Curtis E. A. Karnow’s Litigation in Practice provides invaluable tips, court room strategies and helpful insights of the trial process, with a no-nonsense writing style, offering “court room do’s and don’ts” that every new trial lawyer and student needs in understanding that “law is what happens in the courtroom.” Other sections provide advanced practical guidance for settlement, case management, using case precedent, and expert testimony. -Publisher


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Law Library April Book of the Month

Attorney’s Handbook of Accounting, Auditing and Financial Reporting

By D. Edward Martin, MBA, CPA, CFE

While attorneys seem to use nothing but words, words, words, sometimes even they need to use numbers too. Luckily the Law Library has the Attorney’s Handbook of Accounting, Auditing, and Financial Reporting by D. Edward Martin, a desktop reference dealing with fundamental and straightforward financial issues. True to its name, the Attorney’s Handbook helps attorneys gain a basic familiarity with major accounting, auditing, and financial reporting topics. In clear, plain language, the Handbook offers a selection of up-to-date business subjects of interest to attorneys, and also explains the various services and specialized support accountants provide for the legal profession. The text features chapters on accountants’ legal liability, reporting for not-for-profit organizations, and Securities and Exchange regulations, as well as practical examples, including sample letters, forms, and financial statements. Look for this great resource at the Library today!

The Attorney’s Handbook was part of our February 2017 Book Drive, and Vincent O’Gara generously contributed towards the purchase of this book, which we had to stop updating in 2015. Please check our website for more Book Drives throughout the year. To donate, please contact sflawlibrary@sfgov.org or call (415) 554-1791.


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Law Library March Book of the Month

Point Taken: How to Write Like the World’s Best Judges

By Ross Guberman

This terrific new book by Ross Guberman evaluates the work of 34 of the best judicial opinion-writers from Learned Hand to Antonin Scalia, and offers a step-by-step method to transform “great judicial writing” into “great writing.”
The author offers strategies for pruning clutter, adding background, guiding the reader by emphasizing key points, and adopting a narrative voice with the assistance of visual cues.
Guberman shares his style of “Must Haves,” meaning a largess of edits at the word and sentence level that make opinions more vivid, varied, confident, and enjoyable. He also outlines his style of “Nice to Haves”—similes, examples, and analogies.
The author also addresses the onerous problem of dissents, finding the best practices for dissents based on facts, doctrine, or policy.
An appendix provides the biographies of the featured judges, as well as a list of practice pointers.
This book is an entertaining read, which is relatively rare for such an informative resource.
Even if you are not a judge or a judge’s clerk, check this book out and give yourself a well-earned learned hand!
Point Taken was part of our January Book Drive, and was kindly donated to the law library by Shannon Miller at Duane Morris LLP.

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